Volume 75, Issue 4 p. 377-392

Readiness for organizational change: A longitudinal study of workplace, psychological and behavioural correlates

Charles E. Cunningham

Corresponding Author

Charles E. Cunningham

Hamilton Health Sciences and McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Requests for reprints should be addressed to Charles E. Cunningham, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5, Canada (e-mail: [email protected]).Search for more papers by this author
Christel A. Woodward

Christel A. Woodward

McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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Harry S. Shannon

Harry S. Shannon

McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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John MacIntosh

John MacIntosh

Hamilton Health Sciences and McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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Bonnie Lendrum

Bonnie Lendrum

Hamilton Health Sciences and McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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David Rosenbloom

David Rosenbloom

Hamilton Health Sciences and McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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Judy Brown

Judy Brown

McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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First published: 16 December 2010
Citations: 316

Abstract

To examine factors influencing readiness for healthcare organizational change, 654 randomly selected hospital staff completed questionnaires measuring the logistical and occupational risks of change, ability to cope with change and to solve jobrelated problems, social support, measures of Karasek's (1979) active vs. passive job construct (job demand× decision latitude) and readiness for organizational change. Workers in active jobs (Karasek, 1979) which afforded higher decision latitude and control over challenging tasks reported a higher readiness for organizational change scores. Workers with an active approach to job problem-solving with higher job change self-efficacy scores reported a higher readiness for change. In hierarchical regression analyses, active jobs, an active job problem-solving style and job-change self-efficacy contributed independently to the prediction of readiness for organizational change. Time 1 readiness for organizational change scores and an active approach to job problem-solving were the best predictors of participation in redesign activities during a year-long re-engineering programme.